Sunday, April 4, 2010

Pearls ~ A Girl's Best Friend

Pearls are always in Vogue.

Audrey Hepburn knew where to find pearls.

In the South, there are several things that are a given; Pearls, Pearls, Pearls.  Sure we love the little black dress, gloves, hats, and the occasional mint julep, but we are not dressed until we have adorned ourselves with that perfect strand or two, and we wear them with everything, from our favorite frock to our t-shirt and jeans.  Did I mention that we sometimes sleep in them?

Jackie Kennedy

Of course we are not the only ladies that love this beautiful gift from the sea.  There are millions of women who choose to finish there attire with a lovely strand of pearls.  Ask around. You will be hard pressed to find a well dressed lady that doesn't love their pearls.

So, for those of you that missed my posts on "The Little Black Dress" and "Gloves", I have provided the links below. But don't y'all leave yet, because we have a lot to learn and see with regards to "The Pearl."

Note to readers: Formats may be off due to new template. I am working to reformat past posts.

These  tahition pearls ....

and these beautiful white pearls are from
Mikimotand can be found at
Brombergs Jewelers.

A strand of these over-the-top gorgeous white pearls with diamonds...

and these chocolate tahitian pearls are from Tiffany.

Blue Nile is an online source for pearls.

This information and chart from Mikimoto provides information that proves to be helpful in choosing the right pearls for you.


Luster is the amount of light reflected from the pearl's surface. Luster is the surface glow, as well as the deep mirror-like reflection of the light, or “inner light”. Nacre quality in cultured pearls will improve the overall luster. Many even layers of nacre are required to create a highly defined spectrum of color. Only the highest quality pearls with the best luster carry the MIKIMOTO name.

Surface Perfection

As a product of nature, tiny marks found on pearls are part of their natural texture and are proof of the genuineness of a cultured pearl. These blemishes are produced by outside sea particles and objects that find their way into the oyster and brush against the pearl. A pearl is considered more valuable when the surface imperfections are minimal.


There is a wide spectrum of colors that can be found in pearls. Basic colors include cream, gray, green, blue and pink. The most popular colors are white and pink rosé because these shades flatter the widest range of skin tones. Color is based on preference, but it is always important to find a color that is rich and evenly distributed on the pearl.


Although many shapes are available, perfectly round pearls are the rarest and most valuable. Button pearls are round on one side and flat on the opposite end. Other shapes like tear drop and baroque are also favored because of their uniqueness. They are formed when an outside entity attaches itself onto the forming pearl and it is covered by nacre layers.


Generally, the size of the pearl affects the price. Large pearls are more difficult to cultivate because of the large size of the implanted nucleus. There is an increased likelihood that the oyster will reject the nucleus. Pearls are measured in diameter increments of millimeters (mm). The classic Akoya pearl generally ranges from 3.5mm to 10mm in size. South Sea (White, Golden, or Black) pearl sizes begin at 8mm and can be as large as 18mm.

I hope that you have enjoyed this post on pearls, and that this information will help you choose a strand of pearls that you will enjoy for a lifetime.
See you soon,

There are two etiquette posts in this post.

Embracing Etiquette with Teresa continued... see introduction post (1-29-10.)


When three people or more are waiting to board a bus, form a line, then wait your turn, no matter how crowded the bus is. Have your change or fare ready so that you will not hold up everyone else while you look for it. If there are plenty of seats available, leave those at the front for passengers who are elderly or disabled, even if not designated as such.

Bus riders are subject to more cell phone conversations than underground transit. The average person DOES NOT want to listen to you blab away about issues that mean nothing to them. Too much noise is unnerving.

Monday we will cover Subways and Other City Trains.

Embracing Etiquette with Teresa continued... see introduction post (1-29-10.)


When a city train (subway or above ground) pulls into the station, step aside to let passengers get off of the train. Not doing so is very discourteous. Door-blockers also block inside train doors and this is considered not only rude, but aggressive. When people are attempting to get off of the train, step off until they get off. You will then be able to get back on before the train departs.

If the riders are packed in tight, wait for the next train. Shouldering people aside is one of the most obnoxious offense.

DO NOT hold the door someone trying to get to the door, nor should you pry open the door or block it with a briefcase. You may lose your briefcase (you deserve to.)

Tomorrow we will cover Commuter Trains.

See you soon,
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