Tuesday, March 30, 2010

Pristine Surroundings ~ Kay O'Toole

Kay O'Toole uses statues and other forms of handmade eloquent heirlooms to make these clean rooms feel comfortable.


These images can be found in the April 2010 issue of Veranda Magazine.

Emily Post's Etiquette, 17th Edition (Thumb Indexed)
Emily Post's Etiquette, 17th Edition (Thumb Indexed)

Embracing Etiquette with Teresa continued... see introduction post (1-29-10.)


If you are walking your dog on an urban street, make sure that the leash doesn’t block traffic or trip a pedestrian. Retractable leashes are dangerous in this setting, and they become virtually invisible to some walkers, cyclists, and joggers.
I am not sure where these people live, but if you tie your dog to a parking meter or lamp post while you shop or eat, make sure they don’t bark. This bothers the passerby and establishment patrons. (I was tempted to leave this out, but it may be important for someone living in Mayberry, which is not a bad thing.)

YOU MUST REMOVE YOUR DOGS POOP WITH A POOPER-SCOOPER OR A BAG. This sends me. It is hard for me to believe that there are actually people irrational and pathetic enough to let their dog poopie on someone’s property and have the audacity to leave it there. You know who you are, and I don’t want to know you. Ok, back to the book. It doesn’t matter how big of a hurry you are in and where you are. CLEAN UP!

Before letting your dog socialize with another dog, make sure it is alright with the owner of the dog. Double that for children. Ask the child’s parent if it is alright. Now if you have a ten pound monster like I do, it wouldn’t be wise. Make certain that your dog doesn’t jump on, nuzzle of bounce off of the child.

Tell adults and children alike about your dogs personality and habit, even if your visit will be short. No surprises please.

Tomorrow we will cover Public Transportation.

See you soon,
 photo signature_zps513df16d.png